What is fair trade clothing?

Fair trade clothing, or honest clothing are garments that are produced under good working conditions for the farmers and tailors who made the product. What does that entail? Good working conditions among other things include a living wage, no forced overtime, no child labor and a safe workplace.

Fair trade clothing is often associated with production that is done with respect for the environment. This is, for example, the use of products that have minimal impact on the environment. Think of materials that use less water or production processes that cause minimal CO2 emissions.

Why do we believe good working conditions are important?

Our founder, Jitske Lundgren, started studio JUX with the idea that fashion should be fun for everyone. That means for the designer, the farmer, the tailor and the wearer. In many of the clothing factories, the working conditions are certainly not fun, the hours are extreme and the salaries are very low. The circumstances are also often unsafe and sometimes child labor is still used.

Jitske once encountered a purple man during a trip to India, this man's skin was completely discoloured because he was bathing in dyeing materials for our clothes every day. This was one of the moments it was clear to Jitske that she wanted to do things differently.

How does studio JUX ensure honest clothing?

To be absolutely sure that our clothing is produced in a fair way, we have our own fair trade factory in Kathmandu, Nepal. This allows us to personally see to it that the working conditions for our employees are good. In addition, this gives us the opportunity to build a personal relationship with the tailors in the factory and to assist them in their development as much as possible. We have made up a code of conduct for this as well.

We also work with smaller women empowerment projects for our ceramic and care products, for example. Where the women in the projects learn to make these products and we offer them employment. This creates a big positive social impact on these women and their families.